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Barnes and Noble

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Barnes and Noble as known to many is a publishing company that produces reading materials that are released both in the physical market and through the internet. It could not be denied that this particular scope of the business could actually define the being of the company’s capabilities of remaining at the top of the competition in the field of international publishing and distribution. Basically, this is the reason why shareholders of the company remains strongly assured that their investments in the organization would specifically be given the proper returns at the end of each agreed period.

There has been an issue though in connection with Burkle and Aletheia Research and Management taking over the company’s operations. This is basically in lateral definition with the past case that Burkle presented to Barnes and Noble which imposed on the affecting matter on the shareholder’s values receivable from the company. The case was rather unsuccessful. The idea was that both Burkle and Aletheia already owned a share of the publishing company. What they are working on basically aims to increase the percentage of the business that they have control with hence increasing both their authority and their chance of earning from the operations of the business.

In the position of SEC, the shareholders have an equal right to choose the directors who are supposed to manage their position in the company thus giving them rightful control in the business and the profit shares that they are supposed to receive. Believably, as seen from that of the case of Barnes and Noble, SEC’s position intends to create a more definite indication of authority for all the stakeholders of the company and not for Burkel and Alethia alone. The amount of their investment should not be considered as the determining factor. 

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